Cc is taking the piss out of me

Discussion in 'Cane Corso' started by Tracyhc, Jul 13, 2020.

  1. Tracyhc

    Tracyhc New Member

    Hi could experienced cc owners PLEASE advise me on how to teach my cc to not take the living piss out of me! Im really having problems with my 11 months old female cc. At the moment she just does not listen to me, she will have my cushions, my coats my boots my clothes, everything and when I shout and tell her as firm as I can she just doesn't listen to me at all, I've been told to prize her mouth open to get things from her but she likes to get better grip so I'm really hesitant to put my fingers near her teeth, she could accidentally clamp down on my fingers. I'm nearly in tears trying to tell her no and it's bad etc, she some times growls but I don't think it's a mean growl because she growels when she wants you to play also. Even if I'm not giving her attention she will pull on my trainer laces and then bottom of my jeans, I have to tuck my pants into my socs so she can't get a grip of anything on me to pull me. Please can someone tell me how they would deal with this??
     
    glen likes this.
  2. glen

    glen Super Moderator Staff Member

    She knows she can get you attention this way, she sounds like shes needs to get rid of some of that energy.
    I would structure her days.
    I have 3 ccs,
    Routine is a big deal, from when i feed,walk, play, and the biggest routine is training.
    The second she gets your attention with you giving chase with clothes ect shes acheived what she wants.
    Is she crate trained , as she got her own chew toys, is she disruptive when shes left, is she left a lot , does she get exer ise regular.
    If you could tell us her daily routine i will try to help.
    And no id never pit my hand in a dogs mouth if i wasnt sure they werent foing to chomp down.
    Dont dispair you can change her behaviour . Most of the time a few little changes makes a huge difference.
     
  3. Zeela

    Zeela Well-Known Member

    Lots and lots of exercise, like Glen said it sounds like a lot of pent up energy that she needs to get out.
     
    glen likes this.
  4. Zeela

    Zeela Well-Known Member

    One more thing, pay attention to too much salt in her food. I've noticed when Zeela eats has too much salt, she gets extremely energized and aggressive. Just a heads up. I know that is does affect her so something to consider as well.
     
    glen likes this.
  5. Tracyhc

    Tracyhc New Member

    Hi and thanks for your reply, well she has a lot of toys, and Bones. But sometimes doesn't seem to be enough as she goes for my cushions and settee cushions, I have to really shout at her to get her to let go, if it's not them it's my ankles and jumpers etc. She's not on her own at all really. If she is it's only an hour or so. I try take her for walks but she won't go far at all. If a bike is near or group of ppl or a car running then that's it she will not move. I've tried to calm her down and tell her it's ok, doesn't make a difference. I've only once got hold of her collor and pulled her to move she didn't like it but she eventually started walking. I didn't like forcing her tho. I just don't know how to get her out of being scared of noises etc on walks. Ppl say she needs structure but I'm not clear on what I need to do about structure. Could you please advise me on where I'm going wrong. See she listens to my friend as she's so much more firmer but she just takes the piss with me. I really try and give commands but she takes no notice of me. Amy advice is appreciated. Thanks.
     
  6. marke

    marke Well-Known Member

    you need to walk her with other dogs that are good at it and not bothered by anything ............. obedience classes wouldn't hurt .......
     
    Boxergirl likes this.
  7. Loverboy Skyline

    Loverboy Skyline Active Member

    I don't think there's really a simple solution. It seems to me there's an underlying problem that your dog doesn't respect your authority. You have to assert yourself as the pack leader. Obedience training definitely helps because she will get into the habit of obeying you, but there's also a lot of subtle things involved including your tone of voice, how confidently and assertively you carry yourself, etc. For one thing, it's usually not a good idea to lose your temper and yell at the dog because then the dog senses weakness. You need to be a strong authority figure. Do you have Disney+ streaming service? They have all the episodes of The Dog Whisperer, and he explains these things very well.
     
  8. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I think working on "leave it" would be a great help to you. Leave it is used to mean stop whatever you're doing immediately. It works for releasing things they have in their mouths, ignoring food dropped on the floor or on the sidewalk, leaving the cat alone, etc. Pretty much anything.

    http://www.clickerlessons.com/leaveit.htm

    Here are two videos of my daughter's boy, Otis, practicing his leave it. The one where he pointedly ignores the treats is my favorite.



     
    Elizabeth Balcomb and glen like this.
  9. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I know that I may get backlash for this, but Cesar Millan uses outdated techniques that can be dangerous and detrimental to the dogs as well as be dangerous to the owner. Veterinary behaviorists do not agree with his confrontational techniques. I do think structure and rules are the basis for a good relationship with any dog, so I don't disagree with everything he says. I do think there are better resources available now that do not utilize some of his heavy handed techniques.

    Here's a quick link to an opinion from the behavior world as food for thought. Not looking for a huge debate. We already have plenty of those in older posts. Just giving a warning and asking people to do some research on newer, less confrontational methods and make their own decisions.

    http://www.animalbehavior.net/Visitors/CesarMillan_Luescher.htm
     
    glen likes this.
  10. glen

    glen Super Moderator Staff Member

    Iv picked up on a couple of things in your reply,
    I gaurantee when she gets your cushions ect your running in all hyped up, that will step her up also, try diversion, what does she like the most a squeeky toy, a whistle, food, id make a noise that gets her attention then get her to come to you exchange what you dont want her to have without the hype. Even clap your hands loudly. Use a strong voice, a command that your going to stick to when you want her to stop what its doing , like leave it or drop it, then use the here command to get her to come to you. Your playing a great tug of war game when your trying to get the cushions off. And if your chasing her shes loving it . Like i said a loud noise to stop her and get her attention.
    When your walking you cant let her get her own way , if she doesnt like something youve got to coax her . Not drag her . Divert her attention to you . It sounds like a fear stage. And yes if youve got a friend with a dog thats ok walk with them a few times but not all the time .
    Its all in your body language, stay calm and tell yourself your in control, she will pick up on it, do lots of training in the home she needs mental stimulation just as much as physical exercise. I still do training every day with the boys.
    Keep us informed you can do this
     
    Boxergirl likes this.
  11. glen

    glen Super Moderator Staff Member

    Agree with boxergirl,
    Also i use leave it , and drop it .
     
  12. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    One other thing to add to Glen's excellent advice. Don't confuse confidence with dominance. Being a confident owner is not the same thing as dominating your dog. Dogs, like children, need rules and structure. I strongly suggest a reward based training program. I understand that it's very difficult to do that in many places as things are right now. My daughter is currently offering behavior consults and training sessions with Zoom. She has her clients send her videos of them training or any problem behaviors between Zoom sessions. It seems to be working very well. In some cases even better because she's able to watch the videos over and over and see small things in body language, etc. that may be missed in an in-person session. Perhaps you can find something similar in your area?
     
    glen likes this.
  13. glen

    glen Super Moderator Staff Member

    Yes agree with boxergirl again . There is no need to dominate a dog, a strong confident leader is always best, you want your girl to respect you not to be in fear of you,
    Make your training time a fun time also.
    I can remember when bud was around 6 months old , he hated the dark out our back, i used to go out first ans start to sing and jump around, he soon come out and wanted to play, and forgof how dark it was. So think what you can do to get her past what shes fearful of. Im just pleased i live in the countryside cause if anyone and seen me theyd think i was mad lol.
     
  14. Loverboy Skyline

    Loverboy Skyline Active Member

    In my personal experience, children sometimes need physical discipline in order to succeed, and dogs sometimes need it too. The lady who wrote the book "Purely Positive Training" also wrote a book about how she trained a dog in Schutzhund. I have that book, and it one of the pages she describes in detail how to make a sharpened prong collar by filing it down!! I just don't think you can be a great all-around trainer without having a few negative corrections in your arsenal.

    It's easy to be an arm-chair quarterback and pick out certain things you don't agree with, but it's another thing to be training thousands of dogs every year and getting consistently great results. I very much doubt that Cesar's critics have dogs that are as well controlled as his or have anywhere near his ability correct problem dogs. Show me a critic who can demonstrate that and maybe I'll listen.
     
  15. Loverboy Skyline

    Loverboy Skyline Active Member

    Have you watched The Dog Whisperer? He's actually about as positive as a great trainer can be. I just saw a video where he talked about the lab who gave him his worst bite ever, and in the introduction, that same lab was licking his face! The dogs are happy and many of them have been saved from euthanasia as a result. If any of those critics can brag about similar results, then maybe they'll have some credibility in my eyes.
     
    glen likes this.
  16. glen

    glen Super Moderator Staff Member

    Yes iv watched cesar, i maybe mis reading your tone but where have i wrote i dislike him, hes done amazing work saving dogs lives, i also love how he doesnt have to beat a dog into submission.
    I dont agree with physical discipline on children or dogs, iv had 4 children never once did i do it and never on my dogs.
    We all have different methods we work with, we all know our dogs, i know if anyone had hit budcuss he would have attacked and bit. Hes totally different to y other 2 even though bud and gandalf are brothers. So when im giving advise on a forum id never advise anyone to get physical with the dog, we cant see what the dog is like. Fear agression in a dog being met with human agression is a red flag. I think cesar said that.
     
  17. Loverboy Skyline

    Loverboy Skyline Active Member

    I never give advice to be physical with a dog either. Being confident, assertive, and not showing weakness are all things that Cesar advocates which actually curb bad behavior without the need to lose your temper and get physical. Not all kids and dogs are alike. Some will need a lot more discipline than others, and Cesar happens to get the worst of the worst. Many times he works with dogs that are days away from being euthanized because they have a history of biting people and if he needs to get a little bit physical, I'm not going to second guess him. BTW I've never seen him get truly physical the way my Schutzhund trainer has; it's not even close. Considering that his show ran for something like 8 seasons, it's a wonder they couldn't have come up with more examples than they did. You really have to go through a lot of episodes to find anything even remotely physical.
     
  18. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I'm not going to get into a big Cesar discussion. There's plenty of information about what he does right and what he does wrong. Many of Cesar's critics are well know trainers and behaviorists. I'm pretty sure they've worked with difficult dogs AND they have actual behavioral training and certifications. They also aren't out to make tv ratings. I encourage everyone to do their research and make their own choices. I feel there are better options for trainers that have less potential to do damage. That's my opinion only. I absolutely advocate calm and assertive and think that's good advice, although he wasn't the first trainer to say that. I would not suggest his methods to anyone looking to work on problem behaviors at home and without a trainer to guide them. As for the book you mentioned, that was written in 1998 and that's not a book that I've ever seen suggested in behavioral and training discussions.
     
    Elizabeth Balcomb and glen like this.
  19. Tracy do you have previous experience training dogs? The cc is well known to be a breed that needs an experienced handler, and I don't think the subtelties can be learned by watching the tv because living with a dog needs to be approached holistically. It is so vital that she gets socialization in the big world out there. All cc need this , and it seems that a lot of them find it hard. They have generations of being bred for guarding, which means their fear periods are extreme. This means they experience a lot of fear over seemingly bizarre things. Not a great experience for them.. I certainly noticed this with my boy. He responded incredibly well at dog training classes for various reasons, his confidence increased, because he understood what I was asking him to do, and he was praised for it , we were surrounded by people and dogs on lead, they all kept their distance and moved in a predictable manner, cars, a baby in a pram. And he knew every Saturday when we got in the car to go, he knew exactly what to expect. He is now full grown, we walk in a suburb regularly, take him to the beach regularly, these are the Joy's of dog ownership. He will always be nervy if a jogger runs straight at us, or a stranger walks behind us, but we can navigate this. When your girl is big and strong, you are going to want great communication between you, it is absolutely vital that you accomplish this. Sign up to a training class asap, or if none are currently in operation, find someone to do house calls.
    That's my 2 cents worth...
     
    Boxergirl likes this.

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