Stubborn/Boerboel any ideas?

Discussion in 'Boerboel' started by Dstack, May 6, 2020.

  1. Dstack

    Dstack New Member

    Daisy 16wks on Saturday 5/9. Walking her on leash is such a battle. Even with treats and new territory she puts up a fight. I take her off leash and she is a joy. Working hard to train her on leash but this Boerboel stubbornness is like nothing I’ve seen. We’ve had strong willed dogs in the past(black mouth cur and Doberman) but Daisy presses the limits. Any suggestions with battle of the witts on leash? Thanks for any ideas
     
  2. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    Can you give a little more information? What kind of collar are you using? What kind of leash? What does she do exactly? Refuse to walk? What do you do when she does? Does she shut down as soon as the leash goes on? What does her body language look like?
     
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  3. What works specifically is going to vary according to the individual dog. As a rule, just make it as much fun as possible for the puppy and do whatever you have to do to make it fun. My Bullmastiff was also a bit stubborn on the leash. At first I was yanking him to follow me, but it looked bad in front of a lot of people who would think I'm into animal cruelty. So I slowed down to his pace, used a fun encouraging tone in my voice, and pretended it was fun. Fake it if it works. I still had to give a few small yanks on the leash when he wanted to stop and smell stuff. I made sure I varied the walks so he sees a different place every time. Most dogs will eventually get around to it because it's like going hunting to them. I don't restrict him too much. If he pulls forward on the leash that's actually good because it means he's having fun and I even say "good boy" when he's charging forward. He's definitely coming around to it now. If I need work on control later, I'll worry about it then.
     
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  4. Dstack

    Dstack New Member

    Thanks very much for the responses. We have a basic nylon collar and matching leash. No choker etc. Some days she loves the walks but most are biting at the leash and stopping mid way. Almost impossible at times to get back home. I’m hopeful Daisy will grow out of it. I’m wondering if when we start out on a walk and Daisy seems to be a bit stubborn, if I should maybe not take her and try again later in the day? Letting her get her way could promote bad behavior? Thanks!
     
  5. Where I live in Florida, it's definitely best to do it late in the day because they don't do well in hot weather. I trained my American Bulldog to compete in weight pull. He was a natural because he pulled forward on the leash from day one, and I always encouraged him to do it. Despite training him to pull on the leash, I was still able to train him to heel off leash and get an obedience title. He didn't learn obedience style heeling until he was over a year old and already used to taking commands. I don't mind holding a strong dog while I'm walking. It gives him more exercise in less time, but I know that's not for everyone.
     
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  6. marke

    marke Well-Known Member

    might not work for everybody , or it's even a method ,but I start pups out with a 25 foot light nylon lead , they don't even know they're being walked …… I believe they think we're just exploring , I guide them , I gradually and intermittently shorten the distance and they don't seem to notice or care as to what has happened …. I don't formally train my dogs , they don't pull , they will heel on a bike at a dead run or trot with major distractions
     
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  7. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    It doesn't sound like there's any fear going on, so that's good. I actually do something similar to what Marke does whenever possible. I start in the back yard and use a long line. Or no line. Rewarding heavily every time pup checks in with me or comes back to me. Being close to me and checking in is the best, funnest, most rewarding thing. I do whatever it takes to get pup back where I want them without putting pressure on the leash. I look pretty silly sometimes. Pulling them toward you or in the direction you want them to go usually ends up with them pulling the opposite way. It's a reflex and it can become a habit. I also often let my pups drag a leash around the house as long as I'm watching them. Maybe do a search for "silky leash." It helps teach a dog to move in the direction of the pressure instead of pulling away.
     
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  8. Dstack

    Dstack New Member

    Thanks so much for the response! I’ll try the long leash idea. That may do the trick. Daisy knows “come” with and without treats. We’re not too concerned about her being prone to flight so off leash is great right until she slobbers a neighbor/stranger. I’ll keep you posted with the results. Thanks again for the great ideas.
     
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  9. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I'd like to suggest, as someone with a dog who needs space, that you work on a default return to your side when she sees another person or dog coming and greetings be upon release only. I can't tell you how many times I've had to run the other way while being chased by another dog with their human yelling, "But my dog is friendly!" I also worry that if she does happen to forget her recall and runs up to a less than friendly dog she could develop reactivity. She's at a very impressionable age.

    Amazon has some long lines with no-slip grips on the leash. This is the one we use.

    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01CJKEZNQ/ref=twister_B07J5QLZ5G?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
     
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  10. BattleDax

    BattleDax New Member

    It's nice to hear someone else say that regarding letting their dog pull! That's what I've done with my Dobermans. Years ago, with my first one, I made the switch to a horse lead wrapped around my waist because my biceps tendons were sore all the time. But yes, each walk is like a weight pulling session and I feel it gives the dog some hard exercise in not much time.

    Yes, I look like I have a completely untrained dog; but I don't much care. Every once in a while I blow a few minds by quietly uttering the heel command while he's pulling and jerking me, and he snaps to my side.
     
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  11. marke

    marke Well-Known Member

    I'd let my dogs pull also , they knew "OK" meant they could pull , "Walk" meant heel …... when they pulled I don't know how much excercise they got out of it , but it'd be a hell of a workout for me , i'd be dripping sweat in January , was like being in a fight ...…….I'd add a caution as to putting a leash around your waist , I did it too , I had a dog give me sciatica by taking off after a deer …….. I wasn't a frail person …..
    took me nearly 2 years to fully recover , honestly I never did "fully" recover ……..
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  12. Dstack

    Dstack New Member

    Daisy did AMAZING on a longer leash! Great great walk. She’s doing quite well in our downtown area with socializing with others also. She keeps her distance from other dogs but is showing curiosity. Daisy also found her big girl bark this morning sitting on our porch-making a passerby aware she was there. I appreciate the input from everyone. Thanks and will keep you posted. Daisy’s a great companion.
     
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