Collecting the new puppy gear recommendations...let's here everyone's favorites

Discussion in 'Products & Equipment' started by belawyer, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    So first off, for all the forum gestapo types that want to call me out for not doing my own research, sometimes I just like the interaction of having my own thread to talk to people and share ideas.

    Expected to bring home Cane Corso puppy mid-December (female if that makes a difference). So equipment I have so far is a 42" crate with a middle divider that I just so happened to still have in storage from my black lab pup about 7-8 years ago. Other than that, I've got no puppy supplies and I'm trying to stay on a decent budget (in other words don't mind buying quality stuff but don't want to spend money on junk puppy won't use).

    So let me here your ideas and I really like shopping on amazon so feel free to give me links. Off the top of my head I know I need to get:

    1. Chew toys I can leave in crate with puppy and not worry about her choking and dying.

    2. steel dog bowls - do I get puppy sized ones I assume to start for a 10 week old?

    3. toe nail clippers

    4. tooth brushing supplies

    I'm not really looking for recommendations on the obvious items like leash, collar, dog tags and all that. And as far as food I'm doing exactly whatever my breeder tells me so don't need all the hot sports opinions on food.

    I really enjoyed this breeder's article and some of her recommendations:
    http://www.lonelycreekkennels.com/bordeaux/YourNewPuppyNeeds.htm

    That's the kind of things I'm going for on this thread.
     
  2. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure what kind of suggestions you're looking for. For basics I make sure I have a crate - no bed until puppy gets his brain, gates, a clicker, plenty of good soft treats, a mat for place work, a dremel for nails as well as miller's forge clippers, enzymatic stain remover, a treat bag, a kong, and nylabone toys. I keep grooming supplies handy like puppy shampoo, wipes for a female (some girls have recessed vulvas and should be wiped) and a brush of whatever type works best for my dog's coat.

    I have plenty of opinions on other things, but I'd need to know what kind of training you plan to do and more about your dog raising philosophy. I know you don't want suggestions on leashes and collars, but there are so many things out now that it's really not a common sense choice necessarily. So what kind of trainer are you? Have you found a trainer in your area?

    The last I saw you were still looking for a pup. What breeder did you end up going with? Must be a new litter if you're getting her in mid December. I also have to add, just because I can't seem to keep my mouth shut, that your "gestapo" and "hot sports opinions" comments were rather abrasive. Perhaps I read it wrong, but it's generally best to keep a civil tone when asking for opinions and advice. Particularly when so many of us have tried to be helpful since you joined the forum. Besides that, plenty of breeders feed crap food and if I were you I'd want the opinions of others before just going with it.
     
    Jarena likes this.
  3. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    I should have classified the chew toys in two categories (1) those that can be left alone with puppy in crate or when unsupervised that are not a choking hazard and (2) just fun chew toys that she can have under supervision.

    I also should have just said toys in general. I need a toy box out in my garage gym for when she's hanging out with me while I"m working out and another toy box in the apartment. And good outdoor toys as we'll be spending quite a bit of time at park. My family loves hanging at park playing football and working out and stuff.
     
  4. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    In other words, toys that are not necessarily meant for teething pups. But just fun stuff.
     
  5. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    I'm going positive puppy training all the way on this one. I did the more respect style training before and didn't like the results (could have been because of me). I'm just going all in with this trainer's methods http://www.whatanobedientdog.com/. I think she's a fan of Victoria STillwell...
     
  6. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    That's just sarcasm. I guess I'm not used to these kind of forums. My online forum community participation is usually workout forums (stronglifts, bodybuilding, crossfit, etc.), motorcycle forums, gun forums, etc. Usually just a bunch of men who beat down the newbies with such comments as, "why are you so dumb and asking these questions, here read these other three threads on the same topic and do your own research from now on..."

    So therefore, I'm like a very badly socialized online forum puppy who qualifies his post as such to protect from those type of forum personalities. make sense? hahahahah :)
     
  7. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    Trust me, I already got warned once for inappropriate comments and I'm like really? what did I say. Usually I'm the nice guy on these forums but completely different audience here from the workout, motorcycle, gun guys I've hung with online before...
     
  8. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    The type of toy that will be "safe" to leave alone with your puppy is going to depend a lot on your puppy. For Kahlua such a toy does not exist. If she can tear a piece off of a toy and she can do that with any toy pretty quickly she will eat it. All toys for her (including kongs and heavy duty toys) are unsafe to leave with her unsupervised (the same goes with beds).

    As for bowls I found a slow feeder metal one on Amazon. It is big but they grow into it. You shouldn't need a separate "puppy" versus adult bowl. Avoid plastic bowls.

    For supervised fun toys - balls, ropes, etc. You will learn pretty quickly what your dog enjoys and what your dog enjoys will change from day to day. The "favorite" toy is always evolving. Sometimes they will choose a toy that they have ignored for over a year. Most dogs love squeaky toys.
     
    belawyer likes this.
  9. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    You nailed it. Thanks! My threads seem to get so off topic for some reason and then I'm the one that gets yelled at by moderators...
     
  10. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    Also I know you said you didn't want leash/collar recommendations. But I strongly recommend the Freedom Harness. I originally went with the trainer recommendation of ez harness and I wasn't happy with it. I got the Freedom Harness recommendation on this forum and I love it (you can find it on Amazon with a quick search).

    As for the moderators and members they are all super nice people and a fantastic resource for information. Those of us who have been around awhile tend to be protective of one another and the forum in general. I think I have a tendency to overlook a little brashness as I am very used to my husband who almost always says the wrong thing and my dad who also has a tendency to rub people the wrong way. I basically automatically translate anything brash and assume that was what was meant. :p
     
    belawyer likes this.
  11. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    Thanks for the support! We husbands and guys just stick our foots in our mouths. I'm used to running with a different pack of dogs online (pun intended get it...hahhah). I'm getting used to the audience here...hahaha.
     
  12. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    Belawyer, it's really difficult to get tone on a forum. Unless you use emoticons, lol. And I'll admit to being a bit on edge lately.

    The first few months I like to separate a portion of the kibble into my treat pouch for rewarding every thing I like. Sitting for everything is a big one. Playing alone and chilling is another. Don't ask for the behaviors, just capture them. Eye contact/attention is another big one. I use a clicker for new behaviors, so I keep several of those around. Like Nik, I'm a fan of the freedom harness but I might wait until the pup is older to get one. They aren't inexpensive and your girl is going to grow very quickly. And I'm also going to suggest a long line and a waist leash. Both are two of my favorite pieces of training gear.
     
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  13. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    by this you mean literally just a really long leash like for taking out in a field and a waist leash for when I'm too lazy to hold regular leash? Just looking for some elaboration....not being sarcastic...haha..
     
  14. belawyer

    belawyer Member

    So what's the story with this Freedom Harness? I thought the goal was to train your dog for loose leash walking. At least that is for sure my goal to have her walking by my side. Next to not having her jump up on anyone and knowing how to sit, I would say loose leash walking is next highest of my priorities. So why the elaborate harness you are suggesting rather than simple collar and leash?
     
  15. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    Training takes time, lots and lots of time and practice and the freedom harness helps in the process. Freedom Harness has front pull (and also a back pull but I always use the front pull). When they tug or try to take off it pulls them to the side and squeezes around the rib cage and they learn to self correct. It also has velvet lining under their arm pits so their sensitive arm pit skin doesn't get rubbed raw like in other normal harnesses.

    But, even once they understand the "concept" of heel and that you expect them not to pull things happen. Something exciting distracts them and they may try running for it or something scares them and they don't want to move. The freedom harness is less harmful to them if they do go running and end up pulling on themselves (no neck being pulled out of wack). Remember these large breed dogs aren't mature until 3 years of age. That means even when they start getting big they are still big giant babies who will occasionally act out or have a case of ADD. Bright shiny objects, fluffy squirrels, other dogs, interesting smells, scary skateboards. These things are all very distracting for their young minds and it will take many many encounters and lots of training and lots of condition and a little bit of maturing until you can figure they won't ever try to tear your arm out of your socket to get to (or away from) the said distraction. Freedom Harness helps with the training, helps save my pup from hurting themselves and saves my arm. Training a big stubborn puppy isn't always easy so any tool you can get that makes it a little easier is a giant help in my book.

    To give you a realistic idea my Diesel is almost three and around 2 he started maturing a lot and getting pretty good at not needing corrections on the walks. But, even at almost 3 years old every now and again he suddenly gets it in his big dopey head that he absolutely has to meet some other dog. It is rare now... really rare. But, that Freedom Harness has saved my arm and his neck more times then I can count. It has also helped me with Kahlua who has the opposite problem of Diesel (when she gets scared she doesn't want to move or she wants to run in the opposite direction or try to jump into my arms). Kahlua is a little over a year now and we have narrowed what used to be an exhaustive list of fears we encountered on walks to one fear (skateboards). So far nothing has worked to desensitize her to skateboards so it is just a matter of consistently working on it. But, these things take time and if I didn't have equipment that made it easier for me (and them) it would be a nightmare.

    I should also mention that my dogs can slip out of any collar I put on them. I would never recommend relying on collar alone for leash walking a dog that is still being trained and even with a perfectly trained dog I still prefer a harness because you never know what is going to happen. They are also pretty easy to put on your dog once you get the hang of it.

    I also recently heard of some leashes that supposedly help self-correct dogs that pull. I haven't tried the leash though so I can't say if I recommend it or not but my groomer swears by it and he has a pit bull, a great dane and a couple other large breed (mix) rescues. I don't know the brand so you will have to google it but it is a bungee cord leash. Like actual bungee so if the dog pulls it tugs them back. No immediate reaction needed from you as the leash will correct the dog for you (or so my groomer swears, he says it worked great for his biggest dogs who were the worst pullers).
     
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  16. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    The waist leash can come in handy if you have to pick up a particularly messy poop... Not to be gross or anything. But there are times it is helpful to have two hands for that... I don't actually have a waist leash. I just imagine that it would be useful in those situations where I am scrambling.

    For the long leash they are good for teaching recall outside of the home (get your dog to come to you from far away outside of your home where things are more interesting and thus more distracting). I don't remember the length of the one I got when I was first doing training... It was something ridiculous like 20 feet maybe even more. But, you go to a deserted wilderness area (or in my case the local dog beach) that allows leashed dogs for example and work on "come" with lots and lots of amazing treats on hand.
     
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  17. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    The long line is good for working on distance training. Things like recall and other things where your dog will be farther away but you still need to be able to get your hands on a leash. As for the waist leash, I like it because I start to teach my dogs to loose leash walk from day one and I work on focus a lot. I don't rely on leash corrections, but on rewarding them making good choices. Often that means just having them with me while I do stuff and I don't want to be holding a leash. I like having my hands free for other things too. Not texting. Your phone should never be out when you're walking your dog. The waist leashes I like have a handle close to the collar if you need to grab on. It's a good way to have the dog with you as well as be obeying the leash laws but not have to hold the leash all the time. Here are a few pictures of my daughter training with her boxer pup using a waist leash (it also transitions to a regular leash). They're also great if you want to run with your dog when they're old enough as well as for poop cleaning as Nik suggested.

    October 2017 062.JPG October 2017 096.JPG FullSizeRender.jpg
     
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  18. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    Great pics! Your daughter and her pup look like an awesome team together! I am looking forward to your next update on how their training is coming. :)
     
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  19. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

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  20. belawyer

    belawyer Member

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